The new state-owned Italian air carrier Italia Transporto Aereo (ITA) is a step away from making its decision about which aircraft manufacturer – Airbus or Boeing – to pick for its future fleet. Let’s take a look at how Alitalia successor’s fleet might look and what network will it be focused on?

How many planes will ITA need?

The newly born flag carrier of Italy was set up in October 2020 and by mid-October-2021 it is supposed to replace the loss-making predecessor Alitalia. By its launch day, the airline’s fleet should already consist of 52 aircraft out of which seven should be wide-body jets.

The company’s goal is to expand the fleet gradually. In 2022, ITA will operate 13 wide-body and 65 narrow-body aircraft, growing the total number of planes in the fleet to a total of 78. By the end of 2025, the new air carrier plans to expand its capacity to a total of 105 jets. 

ITA’s initial network will include mixed operations to short as well as long-haul destinations. As outlined in its business plan,  the airline will fly to 45 destinations and operate 61 routes in 2021. The company will expand the network to 74 destinations and 89 routes by the end of 2025. 

Which manufacturer will win ITA’s attention?

Even though the airline has not yet disclosed the exact types of aircraft it will operate, the variety of destinations in terms of the range suggests that it may own a mixed fleet of Airbus and Boeing jets.

According to the recent local media reports, the European manufacturer Airbus has reportedly stepped into negotiations with ITA over the $5.3 billion worth of tender. If Airbus wins ITA’s order, the company may manufacture 81 new generation jets within 4 years, according to reports on July 25, 2021. 

Meanwhile, Boeing also seems to have a huge interest in providing its aircraft to Alitalia’s successor. Although ITA has not taken the final decision over its main fleet manufacturer, Boeing is reportedly ready to offer as much as 70% discount for the deal if the airline chooses it instead of the European Competitor.