Attempting to fly over the world, Amelia Earhart disappeared in 1937. The mystery of her fate lived on and the speculation is as active as ever. Now, a project claims that remains of Earhart’s plane might have been found near Buka Island, suggesting a new theory on what actually happened to the famous aviatrix.

Yet another investigation into the Earhart’s fate, this time carried out by Project Blue Angel, has allegedly found possible wreckage of Earhart’s Electra in the near coastal waters of Buka Island (Papua New Guinea).

The wreckage, allegedly found during an expedition in August 2018, closely resembles Earhart’s Lockheed Electra 10E. One of the evidence is apparently a 6’’ diameter glass piece, which “shares some consistencies” with a landing light on disappeared plane.

However, the findings are treated with caution even by investigators themselves. “We want to stress that this apparent aircraft debris field may not end up being that of Amelia Earhart’s Electra,” a description on the project website stresses.

Buka Island is in eastern Papua New Guinea. During the World War II, it was occupied by Japanese forces (from 1942 to 1945). During this time, several airfields and air bases were constructed on the island by both the Japanese and Allied forces.

Amelia Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan disappeared when attempting fly around the world on July 2, 1937. On the third-to-last leg of the trip, after departing from Lae, New Guinea, in a heavily loaded Lockheed Electra 10E with the intention of stopping at Howland Island to refuel. The trip was supposed to last approximately 18 hours. One of the last messages received were of Earhart saying she could not see the island and that fuel was running low.

For more theories on what might have happened to Amelia Earhart, read:

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One of the most captivating mysteries in aviation history – the disappearance of Amelia Earhart – recently had a major breakthrough. A new study published by Professor Richard Jantz in a Forensic Anthropology Journal claims that bones found on a deserted Nikumaroro island in 1940s may have been Earhart’s, suggesting that she died as a castaway along with her navigator Fred Noonan.