Back in October 2019, Ryanair-operated flight from Birmingham (BHZ), UK, to Malta (MLA) encountered severe turbulence, which left one cabin crew member with a serious leg injury. Now, Ireland’s Air Accident Investigation Unit has released a final report into the incident, finding that no one was at blame in a given situation. The flight attendant's injury just came with the job.

The incident occurred during Ryanair’s regularly scheduled passenger flight between Birmingham Airport (BHZ) in the United Kingdom and Malta International Airport (MLA) in Malta on October 15, 2019. Onboard the Boeing 737-800 (registration number EI-EMA), there were six crew members and 180 passengers. 

As the aircraft was descending into MLA, the pilot warned cabin crew supervisor that they would be deviating around weather and some turbulence could be encountered, the Irish investigators found. The fasten seat belt sign was on. 

The Boeing 737 encountered turbulence as it was descending through Flight Level 180. At the time, three flight attendants, who were securing the rear galley and toilets at the back of the plane, were knocked off balance and fell to the floor. One of them sustained serious leg injuries and was later taken to the hospital, once the aircraft landed in Malta. 

“The Investigation is of the opinion that the Commander took all reasonable steps to mitigate

the effects of a likely turbulence encounter,” is outlined in the report’s conclusion, adding that cabin crew was made aware of possible turbulence. 

But while the cabin crew knew in advance that some turbulence might be encountered, they also were required to secure the cabin. Unfortunately, it was while securing the cabin when “momentary sudden and severe upset occurred”.

Ryanair operates a fleet of 285 Boeing 737 aircraft. The airliner which was used to operate the aforementioned flight, registration number EI-EMA was delivered to the airline in April 2010.