United Kingdom is prepared to request staying as part of the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) after the country officially leaves the European Union, according to a report by Sky News. The move is seen as necessary to prevent major disruptions for UK’s aviation and comes after the pressure by not only the local or European airlines, but the United States aviation authority as well.

The UK government will negotiate with the EU remaining part of EASA post-Brexit, as a membership option for non-EU countries is foreseen in EASA’s regulations Article 66 and exercised by Switzerland and Norway.

This option would also allow the UK to meet the demand by US Federal Aviation Authority to solve the pressing issue of the aviation regulation after the EU leave. For EASA, UK staying would mean no need to find the replacement for 40% of its officials with expert knowledge currently coming from the UK Civil Aviation Authority (CAA).

However, the move is seen as a crossing of a ‘red line’ by the pro-Brexit parties, as remaining part of the EASA would also mean remaining under the indirect jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice.

Residents of Britain voted to leave the EU in a referendum on June 23, 2016. The country is expected to officially part ways with the EU in March 2019.