Impacted by a slow global economic growth environment and volatility in oil and gas-related markets, the helicopter industry is reacting with a cautious outlook for near-term new purchases. In its 19th annual "Turbine-Powered Civil Helicopter Purchase Outlook," Honeywell  forecasts 3,900 to 4,400 civilian-use helicopters will be delivered from 2017 to 2021, roughly 400 helicopters lower than the 2016 five-year forecast.

Ben Driggs, President, Americas, Honeywell Aerospace, said: "The current global economic situation is causing fleet managers to evaluate new helicopter purchases closely, and that's why we're seeing a more cautious five-year demand projection compared with previous years. Even in a slow growth environment, Honeywell is well-positioned to help operators keep current fleets lasting longer with aftermarket upgrades and repairs."

Amongs the world regions, the Middle East/ Africa is forecasted to experience growth in helicopter‘s purchase plans with 22% increase. Other regions such as Latin America, North America, Europe, Asia Pacific and BRIC countries will have a decrease in the rotorcraft purchase plans.

The outlook finds that the survey showed new purchase-plan rates were lower for the next five years, for all regions, leading to a more cautious near-term outlook.

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Honeywell received European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) certification for its JetWave high-speed satellite communications hardware on the Airbus A319. The certification allows JetWave to be installed and used on the A319 aircraft, providing passengers, pilots and operators with access to Inmarsat's Global Xpress Ka-band service, GX Aviation.
 

When considering a new purchase, operators' results mirrored those from last year, with make and model choices for their new aircraft most strongly influenced by range, cabin size, performance, technology upgrades and brand experience.

Helicopter fleet utilization in the past 12 months generally increased compared with last year. Over the next 12 months, usage rates are expected to improve significantly in North America and Latin America, but at a reduced rate in Europe.