Following the United States, South Korea, and Japan, the United Kingdom announced it would also temporarily ban all Boeing 777 powered by the Pratt & Whitney 4000-112 engine from operating in its airspace.

“After the Pratt & Whitney 4000-112 engine incident on a Boeing 777 aircraft, we have suspended this configuration's use in UK airspace, the British Civil Aviation Authority announced, specifying that “it is not used by any UK airlines.”

On February 20, 2021, a United Airlines Boeing 777-200, operating flight UAL328 from Denver International Airport (DEN) to Honolulu International Airport (HNL), Hawaii, the United States, suffered an uncontained failure of its right-hand Pratt & Whitney 4000-112 engine, scattering parts over several neighborhoods around Denver. 

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A Boeing 777, operating United Airlines Flight UAL328, suffered an uncontained engine failure shortly after departure from Denver International Airport (DEN).
 

The incident led the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the Japanese transport ministry, and the South Korean authorities to all ground the Boeing 777 powered by the PW4000-112. 

According to Boeing, 128 aircraft in this configuration are in service around the world. The manufacturer has requested their grounding.

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Boeing requested the grounding of 128 of its 777 airliners worldwide after a United Airlines Boeing 777-220 suffered an uncontained engine failure.
 

Another P&W PW4000-powered aircraft, a Boeing 747-400F, also suffered an engine failure shortly after departure from Maastricht Aachen Airport (MST), in the Netherlands, as it departed for New York John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) on February 20, 2021. While the aircraft successfully diverted to Liege Airport (LGG), in Belgium, the aircraft lost engine parts over a Dutch village, leaving two people injured.

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Shortly after taking off, freighter Boeing 747-400 experienced engine fire resulting in debris falling on Meerssen, the Netherlands.