Canadian low-cost carrier WestJet announced that it reached an agreement with airline manufacturer Boeing to place 42 Boeing 737-10s, with an option for an addition of 22 more jets.

The order is in addition to WestJet’s remaining 23 MAX orders and extends the airline’s fleet growth plans out to 2028.

"The 737-10 will be a game changer, with one of the lowest costs per seat among mid-range aircraft. This will foster our low-cost positioning and affordability for Canadians," Alexis von Hoensbroech, WestJet Group chief executive officer said in a statement

Von Hoensbroech further stated: "In addition, with its lower fuel consumption and reduced emissions, the 737-10 will further improve the environmental footprint of our fleet."

This order announcement comes three months after WestJet said that it will focus on the narrowbody fleet as it aims to further grow as a low-cost carrier. The airline also said that it will “pause further investment” into additional Boeing 787 Dreamliners in order to focus on the narrowbody segment.
 

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Canada’s WestJet will refocus on narrowbody growth, planning a new order but pausing investment into Dreamliners  
 

The 737-10 will be Boeing’s largest and most efficient single-aisle jet. According to the American aircraft manufacturer, each 737-10 will reduce CO2 emissions by millions of pounds per year compared to the airplanes it replaces. Boeing hopes to see the variant certified in the first half of 2023.
 

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Boeing expects that its newest 737 MAX 10 airliner could be granted permission to enter service in the first half of 2023.  
 

On September 22, 2022, the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) charged Boeing with providing misleading information to investors about the safety issues with the 737 MAX aircraft. Boeing and its former chief executive, Dennis Muilenburg, have agreed to pay $200 million and $1 million respectively to settle the case.

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The SEC charges Boeing with providing misleading information about the safety issues with its 737 MAX aircraft.