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Ruta Burbaite
No paper plane: NASA supersonic X-59 QueSST is coming together

Following years of research and design engineering, NASA believes it has come up with a solution on how to reduce a sonic boom. The agency has been working with defense contractor Lockheed Martin to develop the technology that can overcome current noise restrictions for commercial supersonic flight over land and pave the way for establishing a new market of air travel. The project is known as X-59 Quiet Supersonic Technology or QueSST and, accord...


Ruta Burbaite
Supersonic flight meets another challenge besides noise reduction

Three U.S. based startups racing to build a successor to the iconic Concorde face another major hurdle besides developing a low-boom jet that would meet noise restrictions for supersonic passenger flights over land, already being eased by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), strong support from the Trump administration. The problem is, flying faster than the speed of sound will result in a heavy carbon footprint. Supersonic jetliners will b...


Rytis Beresnevicius
Supersonic aircraft are not coming back - Here is why.

Aviation enthusiasts around the world just a few weeks ago celebrated the anniversary of the first Concorde flight, but it retired 16 years ago. However, it seems like various companies are trying to revive SSTs. We argue that supersonic transport is not coming back. Read more:...


AeroTime Team
NASA pictures supersonic shockwave interaction in flight

NASA captures the first-ever images of the interaction of shockwaves from two supersonic aircraft in flight. Images are part of NASA’s ongoing effort to make sonic booms quieter, with hopes it could open the future to possible supersonic flight over land....


Clement Charpentreau
History hour: 50 years ago, the maiden flight of the Concorde

Half a century ago, one event marked the history of aviation forever. On Sunday, March 2, 1969, at 15:38, the Concorde made its first commercial flight, reaching a milestone in a fantastic journey....


AeroTime Team
Did a Virgin Atlantic Boeing really fly faster than sound?

"Fair winds and following seas" ‒ a Virgin Atlantic’s Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner reached a thrilling speed of 801 mph while flying over the United States. While this ground speed seemingly leaves behind the speed of sound (767 mph), the jetliner did not, in fact, magically turn supersonic....


Ruta Burbaite
Supersonic drama: Aerion changes partners from Lockheed to Boeing

It is becoming increasingly harder to keep up with all the latest developments in the industry-wide efforts to revive faster than the speed of sound air travel. Everyone wants to get hold of the lucrative market of future supersonic passenger flight: from plane makers, aerospace and defense companies to even national space agencies. Having recently made a “significant investment” in Aerion, Boeing is keen on bringing the AS2 supersoni...


AeroTime Team
Boom, Aerion & Spike head-to-head in supersonic jet race

Three upstart companies – Boom Supersonic, Aerion and Spike Aerospace – seem to be edging closer towards the reintroduction of supersonic flight for civilians. Firm believers in the commercial success of transoceanic routes, all three companies have received orders for their aircraft and hope to start delivering them in the mid-2020s....


AeroTime Extra
5 Aircraft Which Will Revolutionize Travel In The Future

Planes today do not create the same mass media hysteria as they did back in the 60s and 70s, with such magnificent creations as the Boeing 747 and Concorde. But yet there is a lot of exciting aircraft that will change the way we all travel!...


Rytis Beresnevicius
The Lost Brother of Concorde: The story of Tupolev Tu-144

When we hear about supersonic transport, immediately in front of our eyes there is a Concorde soaring through the skies. But the story of the Soviet supersonic jet, Tu-144 is as fascinating as the story of Concorde....